Lavish lifestyle meets midwestern sensibility in new Minnesota Lottery campaign

January 18, 2017

Periscope

Periscope launches TV commercial starring Grandma and targeting millennials to promote “Lucky for Life” lotto game.

Who needs caviar when you have deviled eggs? Why not make it rain checkers? If you win the lotto game that pays you every day for the rest of your life, the possibilities are endless. Just ask Grandma Margie, who is getting down hard (but not too hard, cause this is Minnesota after all) in a new commercial for Minnesota Lottery’s “Lucky for Life” lotto game, which you can see featured in Adweek’s AgencySpy and The Minneapolis Egotist.

We launched the campaign to help get the word out about a Minnesota Lottery game like no other. Lucky for Life gives players a chance to win $1,000 a day for life, win $25,000 a year for life or enter a second chance contest for a shot at winning $1,000 a day for four weeks. No wonder Granny’s family and friends are all living the high life — Minnesota style — in this TV commercial, directed and produced by Periscope’s integrated P4 Studio.

“We love the juxtaposition of a senior citizen in a lavish rap video, and it’s the perfect blend of what happens when opulence meets Midwestern sensibility,” said Periscope group creative director Scott Dahl. “This campaign was a great opportunity to tap into the social nature and experiential elements of game playing — and to grab the attention of a younger audience, too.”

 

“Think late ’90s hip house party with a Saturday Night Live-esque vibe, fit for a lifelong winner in her 90s,” said Periscope chief creative officer Peter Nicholson, who also directed this shoot. “Drenched in shades of gold, silver and green, Granny’s digs boast schwag and bling believable for her ’hood.and all the friendly neighbors who help this TV spot’s appeal reach far beyond the lottery’s typical players.”

 

Engaging digital and social components will also be revealed as a part of this integrated creative campaign to help get people excited — especially those who have the potential to get paid for decades to come.